About sraslb

I'm a high school Spanish teacher who remains, after 37 years, fascinated by all things Spanish and who was reincarnated 10 years ago by the web 2.0 movement.

Un millón como tú ….and Vida y Muerte

I first heard the song Un millón como tú by Lasso (Venezuela) and Cami (Chile, Camila Gallardo) on February, 2.  I immediately sent a message to Arianne Dowd, a fellow creator/collaborator who also likes Lasso.  She responded immediately suggesting that she might use it with the novel Vida y Muerte en la MS 13. Brilliant idea! And…..oh no!! I’m going to add MORE music to this novel!  (see these posts! and this one, too).  I can’t help myself! The novel has been a favorite with my Spanish IV for the past 5 years, consistently being cited on end of the year evaluations as one they will remember, one that impacted them, and one in which the music was loved. And now, there is this absolutely perfect song for expressing how Analía’s family and Los Salvatruchas felt about their relationship (with a little imagination).  The song has been an absolute HIT with my students, many of them singing it by heart! Combined with No hay nadie más by Sebastián Yatra, they create the perfect background for chapters  6 – 8 in the novel.

Step 1

I felt like my students needed to make some vocabulary/phrase connections. So, I targeted specific lyrics, found images to represent them and had students match the lyrics to the images as they read through the lyrics. un millon images

Step 2

A. Find lyrics from the song that will support these lines from the novel:

A veces era un poco difícil estar juntos porque teníamos que salir a escondidas.  Nadie estaba de acuerdo con nuestra relación, ni la familia de ella ni la mía, los Salvatruchas.

Sample answers: Y mis amigos me dicen que buena noticia que ya tú no estás
Dicen que ya no te llame; Todos opinan igual , Serás fácil de olvidar; y mis amigas
celebran felices que ya tú no estás

B. Find text from the novel to support this lyric from the song:

Debe ser que tú al final, si eras muy especial

(Additionally, the above text/lyric support activities actually complement English Language Arts standards for writing in grades 11 – 12!)

Step 3

Listen to the song and complete traditional cloze Un millon cloze

Read through the lyrics in English, then sing this much of the song.  We then read through the remainder of the lyrics, where, after questioning why he/she can’t sleep, eat, etc. the opposite is declared: Tú al final eras muy especial and Tú al final eras el más especial.  My angst driven teens just loved it! What a connection was made when they realized the twist in this love song AND when they began to realize, or question, that something is going to happen in the next chapters just as tumultuous with our narrator and Analía.

Step 4

Create a conversation:

Elige una:

  • Toma el papel (role) del narrador y escribe una conversación entre sus compañeros o Pedro. Usa letras espécificas de la canción. Usa también tu imaginación y otras palabras.
  • Toma el papel (role) de Analía y escribe una conversación entre sus compañeras o abuela. Usa letras espécificas de la canción.  Usa también tu imaginación y otras palabras.

Usa tu propia papel. Por lo menos 8 líneas.

Of course, this song would be appropriate in many different situations, not just in this novel.  The video is completely appropriate, the lyrics are comprehensible, the melody is memorable, and the song is absolutely “singable”.

Today I read how Andrés Vicente Lazo Uslar, known as Lasso, did, in reality, break up with his girlfriend, of 7 years, Sheryl Rubio, in September 2018.  There has been great drama, with much of it played out on Twitter. See this article, and this one, and finally, this one. This could add another dimension to the song!

I’d love to hear from you if you use the song or create additional activities!

 

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Felipe Alou, adding, round 2

Last year I used the book Felipe Alou: Desde los valles a las montañas by Carol Gaab for the first time. I blogged about it here. However, I only covered the first 7 chapters in that post, and since I am now working with the book for the second year, I thought I would add a bit more to it.

Updates from the second year:

Chapter 5

I like to use the audio CD for variety.  For this activity, the students do NOT have their books as they listen to the audio.  They have this: Capítulo 5 Obstáculos to complete during listening. This takes them to page 24, stopping where “Felipe esperó y esperó. ” Once they had listened, they had 2 minutes with their books to go back through and read to verify their answers. The map can be used through the end of the chapter and into chapter 6.

Based on Carrie Toth’s explanation of Quiplash from Wooly Week, I made a similar activity for chapter 4 and halfway through chapter 5 (chapter 5 is a very long chapter and I divided it into two parts).  In my adapted version, the sentences being used may be actual quotes from the characters, quotes that they could have said, or just descriptive sentences.  I chose Felipe, los entrenadores, las personas negras, las personas blancas, José/padre and el taxista as my characters.  I ran 6 sets on card stock and divided my classes into groups of 4 – 6 students.  Each student had at least one character.  As I read the sentence or quote, they had to determine the character and rush to stand on their spot with the appropriate answer. Quiplash after 4 and halfway through 5

Last year I wrote about a timeline activity to set the stage for what was happening in the United States when Felipe arrived in 1956.  It included events prior to 1950, during the decade of the 50’s and after 1960.  Based on the work last year, I knew that it was really important to spend more time this year so that students have a better understanding of what Felipe encountered when he arrived.  But, even more importantly, their own knowledge of our history is very minimal.  This is definitely a cross curricular activity as my students struggled to identify even when Martin Luther King gave his most famous speech, or was assassinated, when desegregation happened and how slowly it happened, and even, most appallingly, when the Second World War occurred as opposed to the Korean War or Vietnam!

Chapter 6

Based on the original idea from Carrie Toth, I adapted “La Idea Central” (from Vida y Muerte en la MS 13) for Felipe Alou.  Chap 6 La Idea CentralIdea Central

Chapter 7

Quizz Quizz Change:  The activity where each student has a question card with the answer on the back.  All students are up, find a partner, ask the question, listen to the answer (or help with the answer) and exchange cards with the partner before moving to another partner.  This can be done with students wandering around (in a class that can handle that) or with inner/outer circle (for classes that need more structure).  I ran the question/answers on cardstock, folded them in half and taped them.  Quizz Quizz Change

Chapter 8

My partner in planning (Megan Matthews) adapted the Picasso Plates idea which was originally described by Kristy Placido or Cynthia Hitz (HELP!?).  We ran off the restaurant scene from this chapter. Each student received a paper to place on his/her head (or do with eyes closed).  The directions, script and restaurant scene are: escena del restauranterestaurant scene directions and script

Adapting again from Cynthia Hitz, here is the marker game PLUS for chapter 8. Marker Game Plus for chap 8

Sometimes, some repetitive practice combined with a familiar game is a good idea.  Here is a link to a classtools.net database for chapter 8.  I had the students play PacMan with this, although Wordshoot is also a good option.

Chapter 9

Word Sort: Use these words to have students begin to think about chapter 9. Student in groups of 2- 3, each group has a baggie with the words.  Each group sorts the words into X number of categories. Students can make predictions for what they think will happen.  Word Sort to open chap 9

Dustin Williamson shared a sound effects activity for this chapter that my students really enjoyed. I added one sound effect for jonron. sound effects

Years ago, and I do mean years ago, I saved a powerpoint game template called CARAMBA! from someone, somewhere.  I regret that I do not know to whom to attribute it, but it has been a well played game for many years! It is a game of both knowledge and chance…..and it always delights some students and makes others upset! I can’t upload the file here, but I am willing to share.

Chapter 10

Conversation Circles end of book is another idea from Carrie Toth that I again adapted from Vida y Muerte en la MS 13.  Conversation Circles

Need to focus on numbers? Here is a good review of numbers and info/stats from chapters 9 and 10. іNúmeros! chap 9 and 10

Slam It! Students are in groups of two (or three, if necessary).  Read or project a statement/question.  Each student writes the answer as quickly as possible and SLAMS his paper down on his desk (key to the fun!). If the student is correct when the answer is uncovered or stated, he scores a point.  If incorrect, the partner scores the point.  Slam It! chapters 9 and 10

Chapter 11

Chapter 11 is a longer chapter. I wanted to divide it into sections and keep the students actively involved while we were reading it (example below).  So I created 3 sections with three different games.  Capítulo 11 during reading   chap 11 games following reading of each section

A culminating activity to summarize the “highs” (montañas) and the “lows” (valles) de Felipe. Sorpresas Summing up the highs and lows of Felipe

I hope there is something that you may find useful.  I also would love to see what you are using/creating.  Felipe Alou is one of my favorite books to teach!

Disclaiming again:  I’m not a native speaker.  I’m sure there are errors. Please correct as necessary.

 

Music new to me

I know that some of you follow my Pinterest music board, and some might have my old database for music. But, today is a snow day, so I thought I’d take advantage of it and share some of my newest music interests, spanning Colombia, Mexico, Argentina, Uruguay, Venezuela, Chile and Morocco. So, in no particular order, and just for fun, here are some current songs in rotation, or will be in rotation soon.

  1. 190110-juanes-single-cover-na-606p_25f12d5459b80df8b1a38a3fbe8658f0.fit-360w Juanes:  La Plata ft. Lalo Ebratt  I will admit that although I have been a huge Juanes fan since 2003, I was beginning to despair (after the past 3 years with the exception of Besos en Guerra) that I would find another appropriate song (for high school) that I could share with my students with the impact or “catchiness” of A Dios le Pido, Fotografía, Segovia, Minas Piedras, La Camisa Negra, Nada Valgo sin Tu Amor, Mala Gente, Fuego, La Luz, etc. etc. etc.  At age 46, I was beginning to wonder if he would remain relevant.  This song, featuring Colombian reggaeton/trap artist Lalo Ebratt,  blends Colombian vallenato with a bit of reggaeton and makes me really anticipate the release of his newest album. It is a fun, light hearted, catchy and basically school appropriate song about getting over heartbreak. Filled with cultural images (Colombian police vehicles, spiritual folklore, Colombian flag colors, la plata, el acordeón, etc.), the video rewinds events about spending all his money on his special girl. The very catchy, repetitive chorus goes:Si yo te quiero con el alma (Alma)
    Si yo te quiero hasta los hueso’
    Mi corazón no es sólo tuyo (No es sólo-sólo)
    Pero por hoy yo te lo presto (Oye)
    Mi corazón no es sólo tuyo (¿Ah?)
    Pero por hoy yo te lo presto
  2. 51wwa3achll._ss500Los Polinesios and RedOne:  Festival  I must admit I knew nothing about them, but the group Los Polinesios and the producer/writer/singer RedOne have quite the following on youtube platforms and the Latin music world. Los Polinesios are three siblings from Mexico: Rafa, Karen, Lesslie. According to Lesslie, the message of the song is “Disfruta la vida porque la vida es un festival.” RedOne was born Nadir Khayat in Morocco and has worked with Enrique Iglesias, Lady Gaga, Shakira, Jenifer Lopez, Pitbull……. With it’s English/Spanish chorus, it is one addictive rhythm:                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Baby here we go 
    Esta noche no va a terminar 
    flylight oh oh oh ueh ohh 
    que la vida es un festival                                                                                                              happy-happy-cover-oficial-400x400
  3. Nacho ft. Los Mendoza:  Happy Happy Fans of the old Venezuelan duo Chino and Nacho will be happy to see Nacho ( Miguel Ignacio Mendoza Donatti) with three of his sons (Diego, Miguel and Santi known as Los Mendoza) promoting this upbeat song. Another mixture of English/Spanish, what’s not to like about lyrics referring to the Venezuelan ice cream (grape flavored, I think) bati bati that comes with chicle at the bottom?                                                                                                                     Happy happy
    Happy happy happy
    No sé qué me hiciste pero te amo de gratis 
    Yo soy el chicle de tu bati bati 
    And all I want is to make you happy

hqdefault

4.  LIT Killah ft. Agus Padilla:  Tan Bien  When Laura Sexton shared her post about top songs for 2019, she included one by Uruguayan Agus Padilla called Ni Tu Amiga Ni Tu Amante. I was not familiar with her music and looked her up and discovered this collaboration between her and Argentinian LIT Killah (both of them are 18 years old!) My kids did not respond well to her individual song, but they LOVED Tan Bien, and asked for it everyday last week.  A female empowerment song, she liked him when she was young and awkward but the feeling was not reciprocated.  Now grown up, he likes her but she’s not interested.  With a vintage Latin sound of trumpets and piano fused with rap style lyrics,  this is one appealing song!                                                                               Hey, ¿Qué paso?
Ahora tú eres la que me dice que no
Y en el pasado fui quien te rechazó
Pero ahora la cosa cambió y esa mujer se reveló
Me dio la espalda y me enteré que soy yo
El que se dio cuenta de lo que perdió

mi_deseo

5. Américo feat. Silvestre Dangond: Mi Deseo  This collaboration between Chilean Américo and Colombian Silvestre Dangond features a fusion of musical styles between cumbia, vallenato and urban in a love song in which they are saying goodbye to the love of their life, wishing her happiness even with another man…..but we discover in the beginning that it is his daughter he is sending off to the man she is marrying!!! What a sweet video (and what uses of subjunctive)!

Tengo que entender, que tú te irás
que va a llegar el día y me vas a dejar 
por que tu no eres mía y tengo que aceptar 
la realidad 

Ay que seas feliz feliz feliz, aunque estés con otro 
que seas feliz feliz y yo con el corazón roto 
que seas feliz feliz feliz, pero muy feliz feliz feliz
ese es mi deseo, es lo que más deseo 

I’m stopping with five, but there are a lot more on my board.  What are you listening to?

Noche de Oro, a work in progress

As I mentioned in my last post, this is our first year working with Noche de Oro by Kristy Placido, so I’m on a learning curve with my students.  My awesome colleague, Megan Matthews, and I have discovered that this book is a more challenging read for many of our Spanish III students.  We have worked hard to come up with a number of reading support activities that will help our weaker readers and still engage the stronger ones.

Chapter 3

  1. We took several sentences from the chapter to work with before reading. We asked students to try to determine the meaning of the underlined sections based on context.  It was a struggle at first, and so we did what they could the first time through.  The second time, I added English suggestions to choose from.
    1. Carolina se dio la vuelta y se encontró cara a cara con un hombre joven y guapo.
    1. Era un buen indicio de que él estaba tomando su posición en serio.
    1. Ella dirigió al chofer a una de las casas que no estaba ocupada.
    1. Creo que no pudo resistir mi increíble personalidad.
    1. Ella no conocía a él.
    1. No sabía si le gustaba la idea de confiar tanto en él.
    1. Jacques la saludó con dos besos.
    1. El chofer dejó las maletas hace una hora.
    1. Los ojos le brillaban con la sonrisa.
    1. Me avisó que él iba a vivir con su hijastro.
    1. Carolina se preguntaba cuántos años tendría este hijo…..
  2. We spent some time talking about judging people by their appearance.  I googled some images to show the same people from different perspectives and we had some fun, useful conversation.
  3. We also used the Venn diagram from the TG.
  4. We played Kahoot for chapter 3 only.
  5. If you use gimkit, here is one I made for Chapters 1- 3.

Chapter 4

  1.  We listened to chapter 4.  I strongly encourage the purchase of the audio CD if your funding allows for it. It is a nice change and can be used with or without the book, depending on your purpose.
  2. We prepared a list of statements that we used for two different activities.  First, in small groups of 2-3 students, the students received all of the statements and the following categories:  Martin, Jacques, Carolina, las cajas, la casa. The task was to match the statement to the category.  For the second activity, only the teacher has the list of statements.  The students had the category cards. I would read a statement and they grabbed or touched the appropriate category.  Each group kept their own score.  For my class that was still encountering difficulty, I turned this into at third activity with 4 teams (this is my smallest class).  Each team sent a member to the front of the class to sit with a whiteboard and marker.  I read the statement and they wrote the appropriate category.
    1. Le gustaba mucho la mirada misteriosa
    2. lo que dejó el chofer
    3. no está muy limpia
    4. Era una sorpresa para Carolina
    5. hablaba de una manera informal
    6. tenía 20 anos
    7. tenía cabello desordenado
    8. dirigió el chofer hacia una de las casas que no estaba ocupada.
    9. eran iguales
    10. tenía una sonrisa genuina
    11. Tenían una palabra extraña estampada en un lado.
    12. Estaba sonrojándose un poco al ver a Jacques.
    13. Tenía una mirada misteriosa y peligrosa
    14. Eran grandes y nuevas
    15. Era joven
    16. Iba a llamar al servicio de limpieza.
    17. tenía tres tatuajes
    18. Saludó a Carolina con dos besos.
    19. Hablaba de una manera informal.
    20. Donde puso el chofer las cajas.
    21. Oyó la discusión entre Jacques y Martín
    22. Caminó a la casa de Jacques y Martín
    23. Sentía una intensa curiosidad sobre las cajas
    24. Dijo que su madre era una tica tonta
    25. Tenía papeles, CD’s, una laptop, memorias y la palabra OROTEC
    26. Dijo que si quiere el dinero, tiene que cerrar la boca y trabajar.
    27. No quiere que Jacques la vea y esconde detrás de una caja.
    28. Está 15 minutos de la oficina de Carolina.
    29. Donde están las cajas
    30. Donde Jacques hizo las llamadas telefónicas
    Carolina
    Jacques Martín
    Las cajas La casa

    3.  We used the star puzzle as well as the prueba in the TG.

Chapter 5

  1.  To prepare to read Chapter 5, we developed these five “mini stations” to use.  Students were working with a partner with this document: Chap 5 mini stations. About every 5 minutes, I called “time” for them to move to a different part of the document.  I also spent 5 minutes with each of my desk pods (I have 5 pods of 4 – 6 desks each) to do the oral piece (station #1) with that group.  On each pod of desks was a laptop so that they could watch the assigned video.  The entire activity went very well and really prepared them for what they would encounter in chapter 5.
  2. As we read chapter 5, each student had a copy of this document: student copy for chapter listening.  On the board, via a SMART presentation (which I can’t upload on wordpress) were projected questions and possible answers. They read, listened and selected answers as we read.                                                                                                   Samples:                                                                                                                                    In response to the question  ¿Cómo era Gabriel?                                                        1.  Hay 3…
    amable bruto moreno rubio
    cómico joven misterioso alto
    peligroso aburrido inteligente divertido                                                                                  In response to:     2. ¿Qué lo llamaron los estudiantes de Gabriel?                                   a. Señor Ording b. Gabriel c. Profesor                                                                                   In response to:  3. ¿Que estudiaron los estudiantes que llevó Gabriel a la hacienda?   a. El impacto de las actividades de los humanos en el medioambiente
    b. El impacto de temblores en Costa Rica y la necesidad para reforestacion.
    c. El impacto de las aves y iguanas en el medioambiente

3.  We used the TG assessment pictures as practice and I added some matching statements to the 6 main characters.

4.  We did a free write on Jacques/Martin.                                                                                        ¿Qué sabes sobre Jacques Mauvais?
¿Cómo es?
¿De dónde?
Descripción física
Descripción de su personalidad/carácter
Su familia
¿Dónde vive?
¿Qué quiere? ¿En qué tiene interés?
¿Qué sabes de Martín?
¿Cómo es?
¿De dónde?
Descripción física
Descripción de su personalidad/carácter
Su familia
¿Dónde vive?
¿Qué quiere? ¿En qué tiene interés?

Chapter 6

  1. We used the audio guide again with this chapter.  Students used this document:  ch 6 worksheet for audio guide with SMART  to answer these questions (projected on a SMART presentation)                                                                                                             Párrafos 1/2
    1. ¿Qué pensaba Alex sobre Martín?
    Párrafos 3/4
    2. ¿Cómo estaba Martín cuando vio el microbús?
    Párrafo 5
    3. ¿A dónde fueron para comer?
    4. ¿Quién era el mejor bailador/bailarín?
    Párrafo 6
    5. ¿A dónde quería ir Makenna?
    6. ¿Cómo estaba Makenna después de bailar?
    Párrafo 7
    7. ¿Dónde decidieron sentarse?
    8. ¿Quién pensaba en besar?
    Párrafo 8
    9. ¿A dónde tuvieron que ir Makenna y Martín?
    10. ¿Cómo estaba Makenna?
    Párrafo 9
    11. ¿En qué pensó Makenna?
    12. ¿Cómo fue Martín cuando su padrastro le gritó sobre el trabajo?

By this point of the book, two of my three sections did not need to be so “guided” during reading, but my third section, the group with the greatest range of abilities (from exceptionally weak to above Spanish III), really appreciated the additional support, as indicated by asking them to respond anonymously to the question “Did this help?” student response to working through chapter

2.  We used the Reader’s Theater in the TG.

3.  We did an “order the chapter” activity in groups of two (each group had sentence strips on cardstock to order). Additionally we read them aloud and I had random groups do some translating of the sentences. Chap 6 order the chapter  

4.  We played Kahoot for chapters 5/6.

Chapter 7

  1.  We spent some time talking about “Odiar” using a detailed SMART presentation.  Here are some samples from it:

2.  We explored some of the vocabulary in the chaptervocab.PNG

and we made some predictions based on these words: prediction

3.  We played the marker game (Cynthia Hitz). I used the true/false statements from chapter 7 with an additional 15 that I wrote.

4.  We used this  Review through 7  twice.  The first time, in small groups of 2 – 3, they sorted through all of the cards placing them in categories of their creation (I had 8 or 9 sets printed on cardstock and cut out).  The second time, in teams of 4-5, we played the Reading Game. I read a statement, the team member wrote the answer, and if correct, drew a card.  See the post for scoring information.

Chapter 8

  1.  Chapter 8 is a short, fun read.  I assigned each of my desk pods a sound effect to produce as we read.                                                                                                         Sonido: make sounds
    Moto: Vroom Vroom Vroom
    Cataratas: Swooshhhhhhh
    Martín: ¡Pura Vida!
    Makenna: ¡Bésame!
  2. If you have gimkit, here is a gimkit I created for chapters 5 – 8.

Chapter 9

  1.  We used the suggested “emoticon” activity in the TG. I projected 9 emoticons, we practiced the pronunciation and generally had some fun with them. We then took 3 sentences from the chapter (this is prior to reading chapter) and determined meaning and pronunciation.  I then passed out an “emoticon” card to everyone (yes, there were duplicates and triplicates). We practiced reading the sentences with our seat partners. Then, we got up inner/outer circle and  I then said “Sentence 1”. They read the sentence based on the emoticon and their partner guessed which emoticon it was. They exchanged emoticon cards and the outer circle shifted one person to the right. This was a FUN activity. emoticons
  2.  We played charades/pictionary with short sentences and vocabulary from chapter 9.
  3. We used the suggested assessment in the TG with some additional questions.

Chapter 10

  1. We used the TG powerpoint (with additional images) to talk about our fears. I also added many slides of dangerous bridges to our SMART presentation for this chapter (with appropriate scary, anxious music).
  2. As we read chapter 10, I used lighting and music to amplify the “drama”.
  3. We used the suggested post reading questions in groups of three.

When our break is over, we still have 3 chapters to read.  I’m a bit apprehensive that the students will have forgotten some of what we have done, but we are determined to wrap the book up in the first week after break.  We then will move on to Felipe Alou!

I’m really interested in what you may have created for this book by Kristy Placido.  Also, if you use any of these activities, I’d love to know how they go for you. Finally, I conclude this post by saying I am NOT a native speaker.  I’m sure there are errors which I will gratefully correct if pointed out!

 

Noche de Oro, the beginning

It’s been a long time since I last shared anything! This is year 40 for me, and in all probability, my last year teaching full time in high school. I have struggled with a myriad of emotions, ranging from “I can’t wait” to “Am I sure?” to “Do I have anything of value left to contribute?”

In Spanish III this year, I’m working with 2 new books this year: Noche de Oro by Kristy Placido and, in the spring, Vector by Carrie Toth.  The teacher’s guides are great and I will be using them extensively.  In the event that perhaps some additional material might be useful to others, I’m sharing what I’ve done so far (we are only getting ready to start chapter 2).

Day 1

I opened with the adorable video from Costa Rica about saving the Americans/Canadians. We briefly discussed what we remembered from having read Robo en la noche last year and what we learned about Costa Rica.  (Noche de Oro follows the story of Makenna and her family as well as introduces new characters and new problems.) Next, we did map work (review); some videos and accompanying “worksheet” and a gimkit that I created for the opening of Costa Rica with a very basic review of Robo en la noche by Kristy Placido.  I wanted to activate their prior knowledge!  During our pre-discussion, they were able to give me so many of the details from the Robo story AND they definitely remembered that the last two words in “Robo” were “Pura Vida!”  If you have a gimkit subscription, I’d be happy to share my link with you.  Map of Central America and videos REVISED is the opening map and video work (the videos are linked in the document). We worked with the map and the first video and talked about the animals.

Day 2

FVR (free reading); Baila Viernes.  We then listened (they did NOT have the books) to the Prologue on the Audio CD.  I strongly recommend purchasing the audio CD as it gives students another voice to listen to.  I stopped frequently, assessing their understanding.  We then spent about 20 minutes doing various textivate (example activity here ) activities based on part of the text of the Prologue.  (I used the text from the Prologue because it is readily available from fluencymatters as a sample download.)

Day 3

Fin de semana (writing this week).  We then did page 2 of the packet from day 1,working with the animal video and the final video.  I also had a large SMART presentation (lots of pictures, infographics, etc) that we used periodically on the opening three days.  Following this, we played the game SEIS! (document: SEIS) You probably are familiar with it, I think that it was created by a Latin teacher a few years ago but I don’t remember the name 😦

  • small groups of 4-5 students, each with their own paper but only ONE pencil for the entire group;
  • each group has one die which is constantly being rolled
  • when someone rolls SEIS!, they yell SEIS! and grab the pencil and begin to fill in as much information as they can on their sheet of paper
  • when the next person rolls a six, they grab the pencil from the former student and they begin writing
  • game can be done with a time limit, or you can let each team try to get one person to complete their paper.  I prefer the time limit so that they don’t get bored.

Days 4 and 5, into day 6

We played quizlet with the vocabulary from chapter 1 and then read chapter 1.  I had a SMART presentation that pulled various sentences from the text that used subjunctive or conditional and they had to find the corresponding text with a partner.  We have been listening to music from two Costa Rican groups: Percance and Los Ajenos.  We did a cloze activity for Pura Vida! and of course sang the chorus multiple times! Pura Vida Percance   I made another gimkit for chapter 1 vocabulary and questions.  Again, if you have a subscription, I can share it with you.  We also did the following activities:

  • Picasso Plates (original idea from Kristy Placido or Cynthia Hitz?) Chap 1 Picasso Plates
  • The Marker Game.  I like to play with everyone standing up, partners facing each other with a marker between them.  I read a statement, if it is true they grab the marker; if it is false, they shouldn’t touch it. I keep track of the score by “inner circle” and “outer circle”.  I have them rotate partners after several questions. Chap 1 Marker Game
  • Slam it! Partner activity.  Each person has his own paper and pencil. I project a statement on the board and they quickly write the answer, slamming the paper down when done.  If the first “slammer” has the correct answer, he scores a point.  If he is incorrect, the partner gets the point.  SLAM it!

If you are interested in following our progress through the novel, my brief outline of activities with videos, etc. can be found at elmundodebirch.com  My pinterest board for Noche de Oro. My youtube playlist for Noche de Oro is here. 

 

 

Fiesta by Kalimba

I took a month long break from most things “Spanish”.  I needed it! This week I started looking at the newest music that has come out in the past month, and found several songs of interest to me.  Rather than go with a favorite group (Morat) or singer (Sebastian Yatra), I decided to work with a singer that offered a different genre or style of music.  I am sharing what I have done freely, for the time being.  At some point in time, I may move it to TpT, but for now, I would just like to share and get some feedback.

fiesta 1

This very catchy song may be good for a variety of levels of Spanish, including Spanish I. However, there are a few lines that might be interpreted to be inappropriate. I have not done anything with these lines. They are not included in the activities. It has been my experience that with the proper focus, students will not notice this in the second language unless we bring their attention to it.  With the repeated, “Hay una fiesta, hay una fiesta en mi corazón” and use of many of the super 15 verbs, I believe that the song is a good one for many students.

fiesta 2

Suggested order of activities

  1. Begin with the slide presentation (slides 1 – 7) to introduce the readings and, eventually, the song. Use a variety of questions in the PQA framework to establish meaning, context and connection.
  2. Use any or all of the embedded readings. Do NOT play the song or watch the video yet.
  3. Use any or all of the activities for “Catchy Chorus”. Use ONLY the music, not the video yet. Sing it!
  4. Use any or all of the activities for “Primeros Versos”.
  5. Watch the first minute, 25 seconds of the video. Re-read an embedded reading. Listen and watch again. Talk about what they hear and comprehend.
  6. Watch the entire video. Sing parts of it!
  7. Read the brief introduction to the singer Kalimba.

Sample of Embedded readings:

Versión 1

Hay tres amigos. Están en un restaurante. Es viernes.  Quieren comer hamburguesas. Siempre comen hamburguesas los viernes.  La mesera llega. Ella dice, – Hola, ¿qué van a ordenar?

Un chico responde, – Hola, yo quiero el paquete 1.

La mesera le dice al otro chico, – ¿Y tú?

El chico dice, – Quiero una hamburguesa, mi amor.

La mesera responde, – ¿Algo más?

Y el chico dice, – Tu número.

Versión 3

Hay tres amigos que están en un restaurante del estilo de los años 50.

Isaac pregunta, – ¿Qué me voy a pedir?

Su amigo Mau responde, – Lo mismo de todos los viernes. No sé ni por qué vemos el menu.

Isaac dice, – No, pero mira las papitas calientes.

-Sí,- responde Ricardo, -Están subiendo por el dólar.

Isaac exclama, -¡Uush!

Enfrente de los tres amigos hay un hombre que se llama Kalimba.  Está hablando con la mesera y ella le pregunta, -¿Lo mismo de siempre? Y él responde que sí.  (see document for full text)

 

Since this song is quite a departure from what I typically would work with, I would really appreciate your feedback.  Is this something that you think you might be able to use? Do you like the song? Which activities do you think would work for you and your students?  Thanks in advance.

Name That Tune!

name that tuneIt’s the end of the year.  We’re still in school! The days seem endless and the students are not very motivated.  What to do? Fall back on the one thing that has connected us from the very beginning:  music! When I start thinking about how much music my Spanish IV students (who have had me for 2 years) have been exposed to, it’s a bit overwhelming.  They LOVE music.  There is no other way to put it.  Even the most hardened, most resistant, most determined to not like anything student has connected with some song.  I really don’t know how many of my students maintain Spanish playlists that they listen to on their own time, but it is a lot! They love being able to rush to me on Mondays and ask me if I have heard the latest from…. Sometimes they discover new songs before I do! So, I decided that I would try a version of a game that I loved a long time ago:  Name That Tune! Of course, I have modified it for my purposes and it probably doesn’t resemble the original very much.  Additionally, if I had more time (and more motivation), I could have made it a lot better and added categories for specific items (sports, individual artists, individual countries, individual genres, etc.).  However, I didn’t (and don’t), so I’m going to give this format a try. If you’d like to try it, I’d love to hear from you.  If you have the time/initiative and you add to it, please let me know.

Step 1

I created a master list of songs that my students should/may know.  I put them in three different categories: easily recognized, a little more difficult, and difficult.  It looks like this:

Name that tune 1Name that tune 2

Step 2

I decided that there would be four rounds.  I will have the students form teams (3 -4 students).  Each team will have a white board, markers and an eraser. (For my students, I have opted not to use paper, but that certainly could be done).  With the white board, I can instantly assess which teams are correct. Each round will be different. All of my information is on a SMART presentation.

I have placed each round on a separate page on my wikispace (Yes, I know, wikispaces are going away forever, but I still have this month before I figure out how I’m going to switch!!!).  In rounds one and two, the songs start near the beginning with the opening words.  In round three, the songs begin mid song. In round four, they start all over the place! The songs that I selected alternate between songs that were tremendously popular with almost everyone, songs that were popular with specific groups of students, songs that were “anchors” for our units and songs that will be recognized but they will need to really think.  Each round is progressively more difficult ( or so I think).  The students will NOT see the wikispace page as I play their selections.

Links to the page for each round:

Round ONE    Round TWO    Round THREE    Round FOUR

First round:  In this round, each team will have the opportunity to select 2 different songs (depending on how many teams are playing).  The selecting team has the opportunity to score more points than the other teams if their answer is correct.  All teams with correct answers will score 2- 3 points.  The selecting team may score an additional 7 points if they answered correctly in 1 second.  I will check their answer separately after the selected number of seconds.  If they are not correct, they will be able to listen to the remainder of the available seconds with the other teams to still be able to score 2 – 3 points. Name that tune 3

The red X has been cloned on my SMART board, so that I can easily mark each song as it is chosen.

Second round:  In this round, each team will have the opportunity to select 2 different songs (depending on how many teams are playing).  The selecting team has the opportunity to score more points than the other teams if their answer is correct. Any other team may “challenge” saying that they can name that tune in fewer seconds.  All teams with correct answers will score 2- 3 points.  The selecting team, or winning challenging team,  may score an additional 10 points if they answered correctly in 1 second.  I will check their answer separately after the selected number of seconds.  If they are not correct, they will be able to listen to the remainder of the available seconds with the other teams to still be able to score 2 – 3 points.  Wrong answers carry a two point penalty deduction.

Name that tune 4 1Name that tune 42

Third Round:  In this round, each team will be able to select two songs (depending on number of teams).  If the team that selected the song is correct, they are the only team to receive points.  If they are not correct, the other teams may receive the points.  In this round, there is a three point penalty deduction for incorrect answers.name that tune 7

Round 4:  Final Round ALL IN    All teams have the same amount of time to listen to each song. All teams may score points in this round.

Name that tune 6